coursework-banner

DQ: How could Christian perspectives prevent an employee from performing their required duties? As

HRM 635 Topic 8 DQ 1

DQ How could Christian perspectives prevent an employee from performing their required duties?

REPLY TO DISCUSSION

Unread

Replies

Religion impacts not just employee values but also lifestyles. Such differences can put employees at odds with one another. It can also create conflict regarding their assigned job duties, dress codes, scheduling, and other workplace issues as people struggle to honor their commitment to their faith. An example would be if your Jehovah’s Witness and generally employees at restaurants get together to sing happy birthday to patrons as part of the birthday dining experience. Or even celebrate Christmas and other holidays that as Jehovah’s Witness may consider paganistic.

Civil Rights Act of 1964 (“Title VII”), under this federal law, employers are prohibited from discriminating against employees on account of their religion. The law extends to recruitment, hiring, training, pay, discipline, firing, and other terms and conditions of employment.

Title VII also requires covered employers to provide a reasonable accommodation when an applicant or employee experiences conflict

DQ How could Christian perspectives prevent an employee from performing their required duties.
DQ How could Christian perspectives prevent an employee from performing their required duties.

between work and faith-based obligations—as long as doing so would not present undue hardship upon the employer. Reasonable accommodation can be simple and/or creative solutions that eliminate the work/religion conflict without creating undue hardship. Such examples are flexible/adjusted schedules, use of floating holidays, swapping shifts or specific job duties with other workers or job reassignment.

Reference

Homepage. Tanenbaum. (2021, November 1). Retrieved May 29, 2022, from https://tanenbaum.org/

 

Feffer, M. (2021, July 6). Ethical vs. legal responsibilities for HR professionals. SHRM. Retrieved May 29, 2022, from https://www.shrm.org/resourcesandtools/hr-topics/behavioral-competencies/ethical-practice/pages/ethical-and-legal-responsibilities-for-hr-professionals.aspx

Unread

Replies

I have served with a soldier in the U.S. Army who is Muslim who had to abide by his beliefs and traditions even when we are training. He was celebrating Ramadan during a training event and was essentially unable to participate due to the lack of nutrients he was in taking in his body due to this fasting. This is the ninth month in the Muslim year, during which strict fasting is observed from sun rise to sunset. It definitely caused problems due the fact that he was a key member in his teams training and did not participate for that whole week we were in the field. However, we had to adapt and overcome and put someone else in that spot during that time. Good post.

Click here to ORDER an A++ paper from our MASTERS and DOCTORATE WRITERS: DQ: How could Christian perspectives prevent an employee from performing their required duties? 

Unread

Replies

Thanks for your post! As you mention accommodations for religious beliefs are important in any job. I am in the Air Force, and as you might know, we have a fairly strict facial hair policy. However, we had a Sergent in my unit that claimed Nordic religion. He met with all of the required people and did all the required paperwork, and was allowed to have a full beard because of his religious beliefs. We do the same thing for any person of faith. Thanks again for your post!

Unread

Replies

Thank you so much for your post. I agree with you that religion impacts employee values as well as their lifestyles and sometimes there can be differences can place employees at odds. I appreciate that the Civil Rights Act of 1964 protects employees against employers’ discrimination when it comes to hiring, recruitment, pay, discipline, and training. I have worked in the medical field and the healthcare system has evolved drastically. The healthcare field cares for individuals from many countries with diverse cultures, faith, values, economic backgrounds, and religion. It is crucial that clinicians understand all the diverse types of cultures they care for. This is where nurses should be educated on the Transcultural Nursing Theory. Understanding and implementing Transcultural Nursing Theory in my field of work with my own culture as well with others would give me the opportunity to acknowledge and value cultural differences in healthcare, beliefs, religion, and cultural traditions. Understanding culture would enable nurses and clinicians to best serve and care for their patients which would lead to better healthcare outcomes. Nurses who lack cultural ability will endure a great loss by limiting the care or services that patients and families deserve at end of life. The Transcultural Nursing Theory emphasized the importance of understanding all the diverse cultures. By understanding the diverse cultures nurses or clinicians would be better equipped to provide care to patients based on their cultural beliefs and values and allowing for better healthcare. According to Leininger, “transcultural nursing uses knowledge to provide culturally specific and universal nursing care to people. The goal of transcultural nursing is to provide care that is congruent with cultural values, beliefs, and practices – culturally specific care (DeNisco & Barker, 2016, p. 558).

 

References

Dessler, G. (2016). Human resource management (15th ed.). Pearson/Prentice Hall. ISBN-13: 9780134235455

 

DeNisco, S. & Barker, A. (2016). Advanced Practice Nursing: Essential knowledge for the Profession (3rd ed.). Jones and Bartlett Learning.

Unread

Replies to Ramona Chatman

Thanks for your thoughts on these ethical topics. If a devout Christian works at a good company but the co-workers are hostile toward Christianity? What do you think the Christian should do in reaction?

Some say leave the company and find another place to work, but is this the best solution? Why or why not?

Blessings,

Unread

Replies

HI Ramona! I enjoyed reading your response and I thought you brought out good examples of ways that faith and the workplace come into conflict. Many things within the workplace that we take for granted or could take for granted are areas of deep conflict for others. We ran into this a couple of years ago on the question of an organization celebrating Christmas. There are individuals who feel that that is directly in contradiction with their religion. Great thoughts!

Unread

Replies

The workplace should be an environment that offers equal opportunity. There is a constant fear of lawsuits against a company for not offering equal opportunities. Laws have been protecting these employees for decades and setting a standard against discrimination. Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act states, “an employer cannot discriminate based on race, color, religion, sex or national origin” (Dessler, 2016, p. 95). This act forbids discrimination in the workplace, both in the private and public sector.

Religion is everywhere in the hospital. Where there is prayer, there is religion. The religions of employees must be respected as much as they are for the patients they serve. The Christian perspective can create some barriers in the hospital setting when it comes to the beliefs of the staff. For example, Sundays are a day for worship. These are hard days to staff and also honor their religious wishes. Another example is people of the catholic faith wishing to receive ashes on Ash Wednesday or not eating meat on Fridays during Lent. It can also be a test of faith to care for patients that have made life choices not in line with the Christian faith. In Atlanta, we had a patient that had taken a medication to induce abortion of her pregnancy but had experienced excessive bleeding. One of my staff members was very upset about this situation and came to me that she was uncomfortable caring for someone that had decided against her beliefs. My first step was to call HR. Legally, the nurse has a responsibility to care for her patients. Ethically, I could understand her despair in the choice and situation of the patient. We ended up having a great discussion on why the patient was here and the nurse’s role in care. She did ask for an assignment switch, which we were able to grant as another nurse was agreeable to switching assignments.

Human resource management is a great tool to lean on during ethical and legal dilemmas when it comes to decision making. Truly, societies can’t rely on a workplace’s sense of morality to do the right thing, that’s why there are laws in place to enforce the protection of patient rights but also the employees (Dessler, 2016). Human resources are aware of these laws and can help guide in a decision-making process to ensure that a respectful environment is maintained when honoring employees’ views and beliefs.

Thank you so much for your post. I agree with you that religion impacts employee values as well as their lifestyles and sometimes there can be differences can place employees at odds. I appreciate that the Civil Rights Act of 1964 protects employees against employers’ discrimination when it comes to hiring, recruitment, pay, discipline, and training. I have worked in the medical field and the healthcare system has evolved drastically. The healthcare field cares for individuals from many countries with diverse cultures, faith, values, economic backgrounds, and religion. It is crucial that clinicians understand all the diverse types of cultures they care for. This is where nurses should be educated on the Transcultural Nursing Theory. Understanding and implementing Transcultural Nursing Theory in my field of work with my own culture as well with others would give me the opportunity to acknowledge and value cultural differences in healthcare, beliefs, religion, and cultural traditions. Understanding culture would enable nurses and clinicians to best serve and care for their patients which would lead to better healthcare outcomes. Nurses who lack cultural ability will endure a great loss by limiting the care or services that patients and families deserve at end of life. The Transcultural Nursing Theory emphasized the importance of understanding all the diverse cultures. By understanding the diverse cultures nurses or clinicians would be better equipped to provide care to patients based on their cultural beliefs and values and allowing for better healthcare. According to Leininger, “transcultural nursing uses knowledge to provide culturally specific and universal nursing care to people. The goal of transcultural nursing is to provide care that is congruent with cultural values, beliefs, and practices – culturally specific care (DeNisco & Barker, 2016, p. 558).

 

References

Dessler, G. (2016). Human resource management (15th ed.). Pearson/Prentice Hall. ISBN-13: 9780134235455

 

DeNisco, S. & Barker, A. (2016). Advanced Practice Nursing: Essential knowledge for the Profession (3rd ed.). Jones and Bartlett Learning.