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NRS 428 Topic 3 DQ 2 How does the community health nurse recognize bias, stereotypes, and implicit bias within the community?

NRS 428 Topic 3 DQ 2 How does the community health nurse recognize bias, stereotypes, and implicit bias within the community?

Grand Canyon University NRS 428 Topic 3 DQ 2 How does the community health nurse recognize bias, stereotypes, and implicit bias within the community?-Step -By-Step Guide

 

This guide will demonstrate how to complete the Grand Canyon University NRS 428 Topic 3 DQ 2 How does the community health nurse recognize bias, stereotypes, and implicit bias within the community? assignment based on general principles of academic writing. Here, we will show you the A, B, Cs of completing an academic paper, irrespective of the instructions. After guiding you through what to do, the guide will leave one or two sample essays at the end to highlight the various sections discussed below.

 

How to Research and Prepare for NRS 428 Topic 3 DQ 2 How does the community health nurse recognize bias, stereotypes, and implicit bias within the community?

 

Whether one passes or fails an academic assignment such as the Grand Canyon University NRS 428 Topic 3 DQ 2 How does the community health nurse recognize bias, stereotypes, and implicit bias within the community? depends on the preparation done beforehand. The first thing to do once you receive an assignment is to quickly skim through the requirements. Once that is done, start going through the instructions one by one to clearly understand what the instructor wants. The most important thing here is to understand the required format—whether it is APA, MLA, Chicago, etc.

 

After understanding the requirements of the paper, the next phase is to gather relevant materials. The first place to start the research process is the weekly resources. Go through the resources provided in the instructions to determine which ones fit the assignment. After reviewing the provided resources, use the university library to search for additional resources. After gathering sufficient and necessary resources, you are now ready to start drafting your paper.

 

How to Write the Introduction for NRS 428 Topic 3 DQ 2 How does the community health nurse recognize bias, stereotypes, and implicit bias within the community?

The introduction for the Grand Canyon University NRS 428 Topic 3 DQ 2 How does the community health nurse recognize bias, stereotypes, and implicit bias within the community? is where you tell the instructor what your paper will encompass. In three to four statements, highlight the important points that will form the basis of your paper. Here, you can include statistics to show the importance of the topic you will be discussing. At the end of the introduction, write a clear purpose statement outlining what exactly will be contained in the paper. This statement will start with “The purpose of this paper…” and then proceed to outline the various sections of the instructions.

 

How to Write the Body for NRS 428 Topic 3 DQ 2 How does the community health nurse recognize bias, stereotypes, and implicit bias within the community?

 

After the introduction, move into the main part of the NRS 428 Topic 3 DQ 2 How does the community health nurse recognize bias, stereotypes, and implicit bias within the community? assignment, which is the body. Given that the paper you will be writing is not experimental, the way you organize the headings and subheadings of your paper is critically important. In some cases, you might have to use more subheadings to properly organize the assignment. The organization will depend on the rubric provided. Carefully examine the rubric, as it will contain all the detailed requirements of the assignment. Sometimes, the rubric will have information that the normal instructions lack.

 

Another important factor to consider at this point is how to do citations. In-text citations are fundamental as they support the arguments and points you make in the paper. At this point, the resources gathered at the beginning will come in handy. Integrating the ideas of the authors with your own will ensure that you produce a comprehensive paper. Also, follow the given citation format. In most cases, APA 7 is the preferred format for nursing assignments.

 

How to Write the Conclusion for NRS 428 Topic 3 DQ 2 How does the community health nurse recognize bias, stereotypes, and implicit bias within the community?

 

After completing the main sections, write the conclusion of your paper. The conclusion is a summary of the main points you made in your paper. However, you need to rewrite the points and not simply copy and paste them. By restating the points from each subheading, you will provide a nuanced overview of the assignment to the reader.

 

How to Format the References List for NRS 428 Topic 3 DQ 2 How does the community health nurse recognize bias, stereotypes, and implicit bias within the community?

 

The very last part of your paper involves listing the sources used in your paper. These sources should be listed in alphabetical order and double-spaced. Additionally, use a hanging indent for each source that appears in this list. Lastly, only the sources cited within the body of the paper should appear here.

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Even though it is difficult for nurses to accept that they are biased against their patient, it is important to accept is once it happens and continuously reassess their feelings and their approach to correct implicit bias. A latent human tendency is a type of implicit bias interfering with best nursing practices. By recognizing inherent bias, a nurse will recognize bias that might evoke some emotions towards some populations. Nurses should listen to views from their patients and think of experienced health issues from their perspective to avoid bias (Kaihlanen, Hietapakka&Heponiemi, 2019).

Nurses need to recognize an inherent bias, and by doing that, means they understand and might have certain feelings for a particular patient or a population. This includes their appearance and manners, which the nurses believe should be addressed and dealt with to

NRS 428 Topic 3 DQ 2 How does the community health nurse recognize bias stereotypes and implicit bias within the community
NRS 428 Topic 3 DQ 2 How does the community health nurse recognize bias stereotypes and implicit bias within the community

provide the best health care outcome (Falkner, 2018). There are few steps and strategies, a community health nurse should keep in mind while fixing a bias. First, a nurse needs to notice their assumptions, which includes everything from language barriers to patient’s job status to a community’s health status. These factors can automatically cause people to build up assumptions about the patient’s traits, behaviors, or beliefs that the nurse might disagree with. This should be noticed specifically when the nurse is providing treatments to a patient and tending to their needs.

How should the nurse address these concepts to ensure health promotion activities are culturally competent?

Noticing personal assumptions: This include language differences, work status, and regional inflections that might lead to the assumption that a patient has specific values, attributes, and attitudes that other people do not agree with. When a nurse is describing therapies to a patient, listen to their wishes, and work with active or extended families, one should notice assumptions that are likely to be made (Jongen, McCalman& Bainbridge, 2018).

Knowing patients: Nurses should talk to the patients to learn everything about them. This would help to understand cultural differences and also become mindful of implicit bias. By talking about implicit bias at the workplace, one would open up conversations, pave way for improved patient outcomes and patient care, and remove taboos. As explained by Masters et al. (2019), nurses should also understand assumptions triggering bias such as the patients’ race, appearance, accent, and clothing style that might spark instant judgment.

Propose strategies that you can employ to reduce cultural dissonance and bias to deliver culturally competent care.

Some strategies needed to provide culturally competent care by reducing cultural bias and dissonance are:

Acknowledgment: Kaihlanen,Hietapakka andHeponiemi (2019) argue that acknowledgment leads to acceptance of accountability and responsibility thus making a difference. With reactions that promote supportive attitudes like empathy, nurses would suppress implicit bias.

Education: Raising awareness would help acknowledge presence of implicit bias and reduce its rate. Education can be through standardized curriculum.

Personal awareness: It involves inwardreflection to accept ideas and biases that can lead to implicit bias. This can be achieved by gaining personal knowledge (Marcelin et al., 2019).

In the article Implicit bias can be deadly, it is summarized that ,Without a doubt, the nursing profession is rooted in scientific knowledge. We diagnose and treat patients based on their symptoms, resulting laboratory tests, and diagnostic procedures. As nurses and nursing students, we are taught to remain impartial while caring for patients. However, some nurses and health professionals do not practice this vital quality. However, it is crucial to give up our personal opinions or preconceived notions about “certain” patients as drug users/seekers because it can be the difference between a misdiagnosis or an epic salvation. As health professionals, we see patients at their worst. These people are giving up a hidden past that may be unknown to their spouse or dearest friend. They may share their darkest secret in the hope that we will diagnose and treat their problem

References:

Jongen, C., McCalman, J., & Bainbridge, R. (2018). Health workforce cultural competency interventions: a systematic scoping review. BMC Health Services Research, 18, 232.doi: 10.1186/s12913-018-3001-5

Kaihlanen, A-M., Hietapakka, L., &Heponiemi, T. (2019).Increasing cultural awareness: Qualitative study of nurses’ perceptions about cultural competence training.BMC Nursing, 18(38). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12912-019-0363-x

Marcelin, J. R., Siraj, D. S., Victor, R., Kotadia, S., & Maldonado, Y. A. (2019). The impact of unconscious bias in healthcare: How to recognize and mitigate it.The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 220(Suppl2), 62-73. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiz214

Masters, C., Robinson, D., Faulkner, S., Patterson, E., McIlraith, T., & Ansari, A. (2019). Addressing biases in patient care with the 5Rs of cultural humility, a clinician coaching tool.Journal of General Internal Medicine, 34(4), 627-630. doi: 10.1007/s11606-018-4814-y

Wagner, A. (2015). Implicit bias can be deadly. Minority nurse. Retrieved July 5, 2022 from https://www.minoritynurse.com/implicit-bias-can-be-deadly/

Bias, Stereotypes, and implicit bias are evident in society. Its manifestation is seen in daily interaction when certain actions make one feel uncomfortable or aware of specific prejudice hold against their ethnicity or race. This paper identifies stereotypes and implicit bias and suggests solutions for community health nurses to improve health care.

ALSO READ: NRS 428 Topic 4 DQ 1: Research the delivery, finance, management, and sustainability methods of the U.S. health care system

Recognizing Bias, Stereotypes, and Implicit Bias in a Community.

Professions, must wary of any negative evaluation they make on a certain group of people, race, religion, and ethnic (FitzGerald & Hurst 2017). Biases are evident in vulnerable populations. Cases such as low self-esteem, avoiding eye contact during patient-nurse interaction, malnourishment, laxity, and low turn out to health facilities, indicates bias stereotypes and implicit bias in a community.  Stress is also being an indicator of consequences are in diseases such as high blood pressure, obesity, cancer, and death and damaging behaviours such as poor sleep, smoking, and substance abuse.

A nurse needs to overcome this and be the advocate for their patients. He or she is the voice to the patient who cannot speak for themselves and the health of their loved ones. The advocacy skill can be the positive influence that allows patients to feel empowered and in control of their health.

Personal awareness is an inward compass directing us on how to perceive others in our daily interactions. It helps recognize acceptable and unacceptable attitudes and behaviour and stay on the ground (Young & Guo 2020). Enhanced knowledge is central to raising awareness and promotes a good atmosphere for patient healthcare workers. They also understand their rights and foster equality in health care delivery. Acknowledgment of pre-existing problems brings acceptability and accountability to make the change.

Conclusion

From the findings, the healthcare professional must be liberal because of the variety of patients they meet. There is a need for a change of attitude and general assumption of particular ethnicities, especially in service delivery. It ensures equity and quality care in people from different backgrounds.

References

FitzGerald, C., & Hurst, S. (2017). Implicit bias in healthcare professionals: a systematic review. BMC medical ethics18(1), 19.

Young, S., & Guo, K. L. (2020). Cultural diversity training: The necessity of cultural competence for health care providers and in nursing practice. The health care manager39(2), 100-108.

It can be hard to admit you might be biased toward some of your patients, but it happens, and the best approach to fixing implicit bias is to recognize it and then constantly reassess how you feel and how your approach is working. Inherent bias is a subconscious human trait and frequently interferes with best nursing practices (Quinn-Sczesuil, 2018). Recognizing an inherent bias means that you understand you might have certain feelings about a specific population, a person’s or groups appearance, or mannerisms that need to be addressed and dealt with to provide the best possible care.

Implicit bias exists in health care settings and impacts quality and equity of care. Language barriers, job status, or regional inflections can cause people to assume a patient has certain traits, behaviors, or beliefs that you might not agree with. We often notice that feeling when trying to explain treatments to a patient, when responding to their needs, or when dealing with an extended and involved family. We all know these patients or family members, they have googled their symptoms and know exactly what it is wrong with them and what we as nurses should be doing for them.

You might find there are certain accents, specific items of clothing, or ways of speaking that cause you to tag someone with undeserved qualities. A patient’s race, accent, clothing style, or appearance can spark an instant judgment in you. Do you hold back certain levels of compassion for patients who are more short-tempered? Do you assume low standards in a disheveled, unkempt patient? Does someone’s race affect how you see them?

An implicit bias is not only harmful because it is undeserved, but it can also lead to disparities in care. Even if you are unaware of how you are feeling, your body language, focused attention, and the level of care you provide can be impacted directly by the way you are feeling. Each patient deserves a nurses’ full care, so understanding what might trigger you to act differently will make you a better nurse.

It is crucial to relinquish our personal opinions or preconceived notions about “certain” patients like drug users/seekers because it may prove to be the difference between a misdiagnosis or an epic save. As health care professionals, we see patients at their worst. These individuals are giving up a hidden past that may be unknown to their spouse or dearest friend. They may be sharing their darkest secret in hopes of us diagnosing and treating their complaint. So, we must be diligent and set aside our pride and opinions to provide care that is based solely on the case at hand and not by public opinion. Listen to the patient; do not just hear him or her. Gather the patient’s backstory or social history, which can be helpful in formulating potential differential diagnoses. Nurses must never allow personal judgment about the patient’s actions sway how the patient is treated. Health care professionals are not the judge and the jury, instead, we are the detectives that collect the evidence and build the case (Wagner, 2015).

Talking with patients is a good way to learn more about them. Understanding cultural differences can also help you become aware of any unconscious bias and begin to overcome it. We all have a bias, but talking about implicit bias opens the conversation, removes the taboo, and paves the way for better patient care and outcomes. When nurses are able to address this topic in an open and nonjudgmental manner, everyone benefits.

References

Quinn-Szcesuil, J. (2018). Recognizing implicit bias in health care settings. Minority Nurse. Retrieved July 05, 2022 from https://www.minoritynurse.com/recognizing-implicit-bias-inhealth-care-settings/

Wagner, A. (2015). Implicit bias can be deadly. Minority Nurse. Retrieved July 05, 2022 from https://www.minoritynurse.com/implicit-bias-can-be-deadly/

The term ‘bias’ is typically used to refer to both implicit stereotypes and prejudices and raises serious concerns in healthcare. A patient should not expect to receive a lower standard of care because of her race, age or any other irrelevant characteristic. There are many reasons for health care disparities in the United States, but the IOM reported that one of the contributing factors is clinician bias toward patients of racial, ethnic, or cultural minorities. Nurses with implicit biases may demonstrate less compassion for certain patients and invest less time and effort in the therapeutic relationship with them, adversely affecting assessment and care (Narayan, 2019). A community health nurse can recognize bias, stereotypes within the community by being culturally competent. Understanding cultural difference can also help nurses become aware of any unconscious bias and begin to overcome it.

The Joint Commission specifically recommends that health care providers use emotional regulation (controlling thoughts and emotions during clinical encounters), partnership building (working with patients as equals toward the common goal of helping them achieve good health), and perspective taking (trying to understand the perspective of the patient) to decrease biases that may lead to health care disparities (Narayan, 2019).

Mindfulness is another bias-management strategy familiar to nurses. The specific goal of mindfulness is to empty the mind of distracting thoughts so that we might focus on the present moment, without assumptions or judgments (Kiken et al., 2018). It allows us to be more deliberative in our actions and enables us to recognize our biases before we automatically act on them. Mindfulness interventions have been used to reduce stress and to improve provider–patient communication. The concept of mindfulness is related to the ethical concepts of empathy and compassion, which are cornerstones of nursing.

References

Kiken, L. G., Garland, E. L., Bluth, K., Palsson, O. S., & Gaylord, S. A. (2018). From a state to a trait: Trajectories of state mindfulness in meditation during intervention predict changes in trait mindfulness. Personality and Individual differences81, 41-46.

Narayan, M. C. (2019). CE: Addressing implicit bias in nursing: A review. AJN The American Journal of Nursing119(7), 36-43.

To fulfil the goal of delivering impartial care, healthcare professionals should be conscious of any kind of negative evaluation they make that is linked to membership of a group or to a particular characteristic. A stereotype is a belief that associates a group of people with certain traits or characteristics. Stereotyping in nursing is a preconceived assumption regarding a certain group of people; this, in turn, leads to various personal feelings built upon that stereotype resulting in being bias. Marcelin et al. (2019) defined implicit bias as ‘associations or attitudes that unknowingly alter one’s perceptions’ and affect their behaviours and decision-making. An implicit bias is not only harmful because it is undeserved, but it can also lead to disparities in care. Even if you are unaware of how you are feeling, your body language, your focused attention, and your level of care can be impacted directly by the way you are feeling. Each patient deserves full care, so understanding what might trigger one to act differently will make one a better nurse. A thorough assessment of the community, being culturally competent and social interaction with the community will assist the nurse to recognize bias, stereotypes or implicit bias among them.

Nowadays, nurses are increasingly working with patients from different cultural backgrounds. This brings opportunities and challenges for nurses to deliver culturally competent services. A lack of cultural understanding increases negative attitudes towards cross-cultural care and also affects healthcare professionals’ perceived preparedness to take care of culturally diverse patients (Marshall JK.et al.,2017). Cultural competence is an important component of excellence in health care delivery and can contribute to the elimination of racial and ethnic health disparities. Understanding that each patient is a unique person can help nurses effectively interact with patients. Nurses need to have the ability to explore patients’ beliefs, values, and needs in order to build effective relationships with them. In addition, values, beliefs, and worldview of a particular cultural group are rooted within their language use; therefore, language is the key to accessing a culture, the use of pictures, gestures, or written summaries to improve communication with patients can reduce language barriers this in turn ensures that adequate care is rendered to the community.

Community health nurse may experience cultural dissonance, a sense of discomfort brought on by patient beliefs that are difficult to negotiate. Every patient is unique, yet all have the same basic needs. The LEARN model can be adopted by the nurse to deliver culturally competent care;

Listen with sympathy and understanding to the patient’s perception of the problem, using a nonjudgmental manner that encourages dialogue.

Explain your perception of the problem.

NRS 428 Topic 3 DQ 2 How does the community health nurse recognize bias, stereotypes, and implicit bias within the community?Acknowledge and discuss the differences and similarities between the two perceptions and build on the similarities.

Recommend treatment from a cultural perspective.

Negotiate an agreement regarding treatment that incorporates cultural aspects.

Individuation is another strategy, it entails seeing the person as an individual rather than a stereotype e.g., learning about their personal history, their reason of visiting health center and so on (institute of healthcare improvement, 2017). It requires us to listen carefully and respectfully to patients, seeking to understand their perspectives, experiences, values, preferences, and hopes.

References

Institute for Healthcare Improvement, IHI (2017) Multimedia Team. How to reduce implicit bias. 2017. http://www.ihi. org/communities/blogs/how-to-reduce-implicit-bias.

Marcelin, J. R., Siraj, D. S., Victor, R., Kotadia, S., & Maldonado, Y. A. (2019). The impact of unconscious bias in healthcare: How to recognize and mitigate it. The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 220(Supplement_2), S62– S73. https://doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiz214CrossrefPubMedWeb of Science®Google Scholar

Marshall JK, Cooper LA, Green AR, Bertram A, Wright L, Matusko N, et al. Residents’ attitude, knowledge, and perceived preparedness toward caring for patients from diverse sociocultural backgrounds. Health Equity. 2017;1(1):43–9.Return to ref 8 in article PubMed PubMed Central Article Google Scholar

It can be hard to admit that one might be biased toward some of his/her patients, but it happens, and the best approach to fixing implicit bias is to recognize it and then constantly reassess how you feel and how your approach is working. Inherent bias is a subconscious human trait and frequently interferes with best nursing practices (Quinn-Sczesuil, 2018). Recognizing an inherent bias means that you understand you might have certain feelings about a specific population, a person’s or group’s appearance, or mannerisms that need to be addressed and dealt with to provide the best possible care. Implicit bias exists in healthcare settings and impacts the quality and equity of care. Language barriers, job status, or regional inflections can cause people to assume a patient has certain traits, behaviors, or beliefs that you might not agree with. We often notice that feeling when trying to explain treatments to a patient, when responding to their needs, or when dealing with an extended and involved family. We all know these patients or family members, they have googled their symptoms and know exactly what is wrong with them and what we as nurses should be doing for them.

An implicit bias is not only harmful because it is undeserved, but it can also lead to disparities in care. Even if you are unaware of how you are feeling, your body language, focused attention, and the level of care you provide can be impacted directly by the way you are feeling. Each patient deserves a nurse’s full care, so understanding what might trigger you to act differently will make you a better nurse.

It is crucial to relinquish our personal opinions or preconceived notions about “certain” patients like drug users/seekers because it may prove to be the difference between a misdiagnosis or an epic save. As healthcare professionals, we see patients at their worst. These individuals are giving up a hidden past that may be unknown to their spouse or dearest friend. They may be sharing their darkest secret in hopes of us diagnosing and treating their complaint. So, we must be diligent and set aside our pride and opinions to provide care that is based solely on the case at hand and not on public opinion. Listen to the patient; do not just hear him or her. Gather the patient’s backstory or social history, which can be helpful in formulating potential differential diagnoses. Nurses must never allow personal judgment about the patient’s actions to sway how the patient is treated. Healthcare professionals are not the judge and the jury, instead, we are the detectives that collect the evidence and build the case (Wagner, 2015). Talking with patients is a good way to learn more about them. Understanding cultural differences can also help you become aware of any unconscious bias and begin to overcome it. We all have a bias, but talking about implicit bias opens the conversation, removes the taboo, and paves the way for better patient care and outcomes. When nurses are able to address this topic in an open and nonjudgmental manner, everyone benefits.

References:

Quinn-Szcesuil, J. (2018). Recognizing implicit bias in health care settings. Minority Nurse. Retrieved January 19, 2019 https://www.minoritynurse.com/recognizing-implicit-bias-inhealth-care-settings/

 

Wagner, A. (2015). Implicit bias can be deadly. Minority Nurse. Retrieved January 19, 2019

https://www.minoritynurse.com/implicit-bias-can-be-deadly/