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DQ: Explain how translational research is different from evidence-based practice and discuss application to population health management

NUR 550 Topic 1 DQ 1

DQ Explain how translational research is different from evidence-based practice and discuss application to population health management

Translational research is form of clinical research that was first seen around 1993 (Rubio et al, 2010). So as far as research goes this is a fairly new was to look into things. There is also no clear definition of translational research, but essentially it encompasses two areas of translation one being the information obtained in pre-clinical studies, lab research and the other being the adaptation of best practices in the community with their cost effectiveness (Rubio et al, 2010). There are three levels of translational research, starting with T1, which involves the beginning research or development of an intervention, including the lab research, observational research and phase I and II clinical trials (Translational Research, n.d.). The second level is T2 the translation to patients, testing these interventions and their efficacy on the patient populace, including phase III clinical trials, studying how these new interventions work with disease processes and creating new guidelines with up-to-date information (Translational Research, n.d.). The third level is T3 disseminating and implementation of all the research into daily practice, creating the research evidence found into evidence-based practices across the profession (Translational Research, n.d.).

From this information there isn’t a difference between evidence-based practice and translational research, it is just a way to get to evidence based practice. By following the ‘three T’s’, the final step is to put all of this research into practice, as evidence-based practice. For public health this means the most up to date care and information as the natural progression of translational practice ends with practice. If there is no research being done in the area however, this has a negative impact on the population, as there is not up to date EPB related to that disease process and/or its co morbidities.

DQ Explain how translational research is different from evidence-based practice and discuss application to population health management

Rubio, D. M., Schoenbaum, E. E., Lee, L. S., Schteingart, D. E., Marantz, P. R., Anderson, K. E., Platt, L. D., Baez, A., & Esposito, K. (2010). Defining translational research: implications for training. Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges85(3), 470–475. https://doi.org/10.1097/ACM.0b013e3181ccd618

Translational Research – Defining the “T’s” | Translational Cancer Research Network. (n.d.). Www.Tcrn.Unsw.Edu. Retrieved June 18, 2021, from http://www.tcrn.unsw.edu.au/translational-research-definitions

RESPOND HERE (150 W0ORDS, 2 REFERENCES)

 

This is insightful Sarah, translational research is form of clinical research that was first seen around 1993. So as far as research goes

DQ Explain how translational research is different from evidence-based practice and discuss application to population health management
DQ Explain how translational research is different from evidence-based practice and discuss application to population health management

this is a fairly new was to look into things. Translational research refers to a form of study that seeks to produce more applicable, meaningful and valid outcomes that can directly impact human health. The main objective or purpose of the translational research is to translate essential science discoveries more quickly and efficiently into practices (Eske, 2020). Translational research has been applied frequently by different researchers to enhance research processes geared towards achieving quality treatment processes and effective patient outcomes. There are three major level of translational research including T1, T2, and T3. These levels need to be incorporated into the research processes to ensure accuracy and effective outcomes in the research processes (Woolf, 2018). Level I or T1 often involves development of interventions to ensure that the entire research processes is done effectively in line with the set objectives.

DQ Explain how translational research is different from evidence-based practice and discuss application to population health management

References

Woolf, S. H. (2018). The meaning of translational research and why it matters. Jama299(2), 211-213. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/1149350

Eske, J. (2020, August 31). In vivo vs. in vitro: What is the difference? Medical News Today. Retrieved June 17, 2021, from https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/in-vivo-vs-in-vitro

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Re: Topic 1 DQ 1

Translational research is a new concept in my view of the world, it is a fairly new concept, as nurses we hear the term evidence-based practice (EBP) and research. Translational research is often thought of as EPB, Translational research is the research of EBP studies as well as the study and translation of EBP interventions into practice (Melnyk & Fineout-Overholt, 2019) Translational research is as stated it translates how EBP “translates” into practice, evidence-based practice is a guide to practice, translation science is the translation to implement the evidence-based research into practice. (Tilter, 2018). Translation research has different components to implementation of preclinical studies, phase one small clinical trials, phase 2&3 larger clinical trials, outcomes from the clinical trials, them phase 5 population outcomes research- these phases offer a “bench to bedside” continuum (Tilter, 2018).

Gaps between the availability of evidence and the placing evidence into practice has shown to partner with poor outcomes by not enabling caregivers to place the evidence into practice. (Tilter, 2018)Transitional research has shown to be beneficial in-patient outcomes and health care management by translating the evidence into practice which improves patient outcomes by the utilization of the evidence. In my field of Labor and delivery I have seen this similar process in the abundance availability of research and evidence of the increased risk of hypertension in pregnancy. Yet the physicians I practice with implement in very many ways through lack of translation causing early inductions and higher risk to the infants. When implementing a new technology, evidence or practice it is important to understand the research and evidence behind it as well as how best to safely implement into practice. (Sung et al., 2020) Translation research is an exciting and has multiple opportunities to advance patient outcomes, as an upcoming APRN in a magnet hospital, utilizing this process with EBP will strongly improve patient care as well as nursing practice.

DQ: Explain how translational research is different from evidence-based practice and discuss application to population health management

DQ Explain how translational research is different from evidence-based practice and discuss application to population health management

References

Melnyk, B. M., PhD, RN. APRN-CNP, FAANP, FNAP, FAAN, & Fineout-Overholt, E., PhD, RN, FNAP, FAAN. (2019). Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing& Healthcare A Guide to Best Practice (4th ed.). Wolters Kluwer.

Sung, V. W., MD MPH, Tulikangas, P., MD, Bradley, C. S., MD, MSCE, & Rideway, B., MD. (2020). Assessing and adopting New medical devices for Obstetric and Gynecologic care. ACOG135(4), 160–166. Retrieved May 26, 2021, from

Tilter, M. G. (2018). Translation Research in Practice: An Introduction. Online Journal of Issues in Nursing23(2). Retrieved June 16, 2021, from

 

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This is insightful Deanna, translational research is a new concept in my view of the world, it is a fairly new concept, as nurses we hear the term evidence-based practice (EBP) and research Translational research has been applied by most researchers to influence study processes and to ensure quality outcomes in different studies (Tilter, 2018). Translational research mainly involves the production of more meaningful, and applicable results in the research process that directly benefit human health. Most researchers prefers translational research because in can be applied to enhance methodologies and general research outcomes. The application of different levels of research processes T1, T2, and T3 depend on the methodologies that have been applied as well as the research objectives (Woolf, 2018). Translation research has different components to implementation of preclinical studies, phase one small clinical trials, phase 2&3 larger clinical trials, outcomes from the clinical trials, them phase 5 population outcomes research- these phases offer a “bench to bedside” continuum.

References

Tilter, M. G. (2018). Translation Research in Practice: An Introduction. Online Journal of Issues in Nursing23(2). Retrieved June 16, 2021, from

Woolf, S. H. (2018). The meaning of translational research and why it matters. Jama299(2), 211-213. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/1149350

As nurses, we all have heard about evidence-based practice and Florence Nightingale. Although back then, the term evidence-based practice was not a common phrase, that is exactly what Florence Nightingale was doing back then. She would examine and experiment with the sanitary conditions of the facilities and look at how it affected the patient’s outcomes (Mackey & Bassendowski, 2017). Translational research is more of a newer terminology. Although it can be confused with evidence-based practice, there is a key distinction. Evidence-based practice is the act of applying the evidence into everyday practice, whereas translational research is more the act of conducting the studies to find the best evidence (Titler, 2018).

DQ Explain how translational research is different from evidence-based practice and discuss application to population health management

There are strict guidelines when conducting translational research or what many of us know as clinical trials. There is phase process where in order to progress to the next phase of clinical trials, they must meet certain criteria. New drugs must undergo in vitro preclinical trials where they are testing it in a laboratory setting instead of human trials. Then they can proceed to in vivo studies where they are studying it in animals and small sample size of human trials (Eske, 2020). Once it has proven to be safe, then they can progress to a phase two or three trial increasing the sample size and comparing it to common treatments or sometimes placebos. Once it has shown safety and efficacy in a phase two or three trial, it can then go for Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval. There are also phase four and five trials that help with translating the evidence into practice and community settings (Titler, 2018).

In my specialty area of oncology, we are constantly hearing about clinical trials and new therapies coming to market. It is critical to have a good understanding of what each phase of the trial consists of and what the outcomes really mean to the patient.

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Fluoride in drinking water is a quality improvement initiative for improving population health. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (n.d.) fluoride has been identified as a cost-effective method when added to public water sources to keep teeth strong and prevent tooth decay, it reduces cavities by 25% in children and adults. Research regarding fluoride in water and its correlation with tooth decay began in the 1930s. By 1945 Grand Rapids was the first city to add fluoride to the city water system. Water fluoridation has been named one of the top 10 public health achievements of the 20th century. By 2018, almost 73% of the US had access to fluoridated water; the goal is 77% by 2030 (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, n.d.).

Translational research can influence the development of initiatives related to fluoride in drinking water by providing evidence-based research on the safety and effectiveness of fluoridation. For instance, a report by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Federal Panel on Community Water Fluoridation (2015) reviewed scientific evidence and systematic reviews to update the 1962 Drinking Water Standards. Systematic reviews of scientific evidence support that water fluoridation decreases dental caries prevalence and severity, “community water fluoridation remains an effective public health strategy for delivering fluoride to prevent tooth decay” (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Federal Panel on Community Water Fluoridation, 2015). Dental fluorosis, a condition affecting the appearance of tooth enamel caused by too much fluoride, has also been studied in addition to the relationship between outdoor air temperature and water intake. After an extensive study of systematic reviews, the report recommended that the optimal fluoride concentration level in the US be adjusted from 0.7-1.2 mg/L to 0.7 mg/L. Overall, translational research has supported the implementation of fluoride in public drinking water to prevent tooth decay by providing evidence of its safety and effectiveness.

References

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (n.d.). Water fluoridation basics. https://www.cdc.gov/fluoridation/basics/index.htm

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Federal Panel on Community Water Fluoridation. (2015). U.S. Public Health Service recommendation for fluoride concentration in drinking water for the prevention of dental caries. Public Health Reports, 130(4), 318–331. https://doi.org/10.1177/003335491513000408